Macro

I volunteer in an exhibit where visitors can choose from thousands of collection objects to take out, touch, and study. It’s really cool to see kids using microscopes and getting excited about learning.

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Above: a girl looking at sparrow eggs.

Since I have a love for macro photography, it’s also fantastic to see the collection objects under the microscope. There are thousands of little details and, often, the most surprising textures or variations that we can’t notice with just our eyes.

I’ve been snatching iPhone photos of many of these over the past few weeks – quick snapshots don’t make for the best photo composition, but I’m going to share them anyway. Unfortunately I didn’t note down what all of them were, but again – I’m going to share them anyway.

This is probably my favorite. Here is the “normal size” version …

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And below is the microscope version.

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The reason I think this one is so cool – besides just “Look at it, of course it’s amazing!” is that it’s a dinosaur bone.

Really. A dinosaur bone – except that instead of the bone being replaced with stone like fossils frequently are, this one got replaced by the mineral agate.

Here are other photos:

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Igneous rock basaltic glass, normal-sized:

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And under a microscope:

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The shell of a painted snail – that’s its name, “painted snail”:

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Above: “normal size” tectosilicate mineral chalcedony. Below, the zoom-in:

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Another thing I love – as shown in the photos above – is how you can re-focus the microscope so that different “layers” of an object come more into focus.

A shell:

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The wing from a bumblebee (my iPhone somehow turned everything purple?):

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The wing from a dragonfly:

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A moth:

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A morpho butterfly (those circles are pins keeping it in place):

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Ivory tree coral:

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Gorgeous, aren’t they? Watching the kids use the microscopes and get so enthusiastic makes me want to have a microscope someday at home for my own kids to play with.

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6 comments

  1. Moths are somehow even creepier when magnified, I did not think that possible. The igneous rock basaltic glass, shells and bumblebee wing are gorgeous. I’m shocked at the lack of a water bear đŸ˜‰

    1. Lol! I DO have a picture of a cyclops, which is another microcreature, but microcreatures seemed potentially deserving of their own post since they are things we would never be able to see with our naked eyes :-p.

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